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amish forgiveness

When Horses Cry

  • I wrote the following post the day after the shooting of innocent Amish Children in Paradise, PA.  I have pulled it from my Archives because I believe we need to read it again.

The sound of the horses hooves were heard across the cornfields as they pulled the carriages carrying the Mothers and Fathers, Sisters and Brothers, Aunts and Uncles, and fellow neighbors of the Amish Community of Paradise Pennsylvania making their way to the funeral of the man who, just two days ago, senselessly murdered their daughters. “They had already forgiven him.” the press wrote that morning, and now they were on their way to console the wife and children of this man, and to stand at his gravesite and pray that he would find the peace in death that he could not find in life.

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Meditation

The Last Spiritual Warrior – Living a Zen Inspired Life

“They are an intriguing people.  From the moment they wake they devote themselves to the perfection of whatever they do.”  – The Last Samurai

A friend of mine asked me the other day, “How can I make my spiritual life more than just wanting a new Mercedes?”  In the East they say, “It is better to know the right question than to know the right answer.”  My friend “knows” the “right question”.
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olympic resolve

Living the Zen Iinspired Life – If there is no resolve, you might as well stay on the sofa.

“It is better to conquer yourself than to win a thousand battles. Then the victory is yours. It cannot be taken from you, not by angels or by demons, heaven or hell.” – Buddha

Benjamin Franklin once wrote, “Resolve to perform what you ought; perform without fail what you resolve.” So is “resolve” the missing ingredient in most people’s efforts to create real and lasting changes in their lives? Take for example one’s weight loss effort, getting to the gym, trying to stop procrastinating, cleaning that closet, or practicing to be more compassionate, without resolve we might as well stay on the sofa. Now I believe that at all times we already know what we need to do, we just don’t like it. Most people never get pass their habitual behavior of finding “excuses” as to why “they can’t”. My three-year old daughter, who is my teacher on many levels, always says to me whenever I tell her “she can’t”, “But I can try.” I often tell people, “Today a persons word is equal to their excuses.” We talk a great deal about who we can rely on in times of trouble, most of us are never on that list.

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14
Jul
Shine One Corner of the World

Walking in the Dark

As a youth I grew close to the parents of a friend of mine from high school, we kept in touch for many years after graduation. “Mr. Fitz,” as I called him was much like (the famous 70’s sitcom character) Archie Bunker type personality with smoother edges. “Mrs. Fitz,” was indeed much like Edith Bunker, Archies wife, without pretension, beautiful, sweet, and with that quiet wisdom overshadowed by her humility. I remember one occasion when I stayed for dinner, afterwards the news with Walter Cronkite came on the television. The “Fitz’s” made it a point to sit together on the “davenport” or the sofa together, sometimes holding hands if she wasn’t knitting. At the end of the news broadcast Walter Cronkite would always say, “And that’s the way it is.”, to which Mr. Fitz would respond, “No it isn’t Walter, no it isn’t.”

“C. S. Lewis taught, if the devil were to succeed in England, he would need to wear a three-piece suit and speak with the Queen’s English, and surely never appear as a red demon with horns and a pitchfork.” This morning like most Americans I woke to the news of yesterdays current events, a practice I have limited now to approximately 3 minutes at best, only to hear the same news from the day before and days before that. Nothing much had changed. Hatred, distrust, accusations, true or false, blaming, promising, hopes, doubts, more hatred, more accusations, and more promises that have been made for decades by others who, hated, suspected, and mistrusted someone other than themselves or their party or particular group. Like the saying goes, “The more things are supposed to change, the more they stay the same.” I immediately observed my muscular skeleton retract in pain with the kind of feeling you get when you’ve tasted something that always turns your stomach. My reaction was to pick up my aging and almost near dying dog sitting near me and hold her close to me telling her, “I love you girl.” I needed to find refuge in my humanity and something that was real, my dog.

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2
Jul
images-1

Another Meditation – What’s a Monk to Do?

“Do not be daunted by the enormity of the world’s grief…”  – The Talmud

The words of The Talmud and the words of my dear friend I shared with you in my last meditation, “We are not to be absorbed by the suffering of the world…,” continue to dominate my thoughts and experience these days.  When I add Chardin’s words which point to our true identity: “You are not a human being in search of a spiritual experience. You are a spiritual being immersed in a human experience.”  This is where I must always continue my journey in this temporary existence we call “life”.

What does it mean to “not be daunted” or “to not be absorbed”?  Given the horror of global current events and its consequences, the uncertainty about the future which dominates all our lives, the reality of a way-of-life we all were told was a “dream” only to discover it’s really a nightmare; is it at all possible to practice these two essential teachings?  And when I move from out there to right here in Shamong, NJ and even closer to home in my own heart and mind, “What’s a Monk to do?”  “What can anyone do?” 

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16
Jun
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For Your Consideration….

June 14, 2016

Seijaku Roshi’s Meditation

“Do not be daunted by the enormity of the world’s grief.  Do justly, now.  Love mercy, now.  Walk humbly, now. You are not obligated to complete the work, but neither are you free to abandon it.” 

– The Talmud

Once again like millions my heart broke at the news of another mass shooting, senseless, without mercy, hateful.  I immediately began contacting old friends who I thought were potential victims.  Thank you God they weren’t.  Dear God what about those who were?  What about those who could be in the future?  What about my daughter?  What about the children?  Why?

I do not know the solutions to ending the plague of terrorism and war in our world and I do not want to pretend that I do.  I do know my heart hurts more and more for the victims of this madness; I am fearful for my daughter and her little friends, I want her Mom not to take her to the shore in a couple of weeks.  I had second thoughts about taking her and her new BFF to see TMNT at the Marlton 8 yesterday.  I’m a parent and the suffering of the world becomes more crisp for me everyday, I feel it in my bones, running through my veins.  It’s not over there, it’s right here.  What’s a “parent-monk” to do? 

The words of The Talmud resonate for me.  As a person who has dedicated his life to the principles of love, kindness, and compassion; the principles of justice for all, equality, mercy, all the while working at walking humbly, I have always felt, “Obligated to complete the work,” and I cannot find it within me even though I am tempted at times, to “abandon it”. 

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8
Jun
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Are You Ready?

“When the student is ready the teacher will appear.”  I’ve thought a great deal about that and how it sounds a little like a saying that showed up in the 70’s, “Today is the first day of the rest of your life.” – And everyone I knew began procrastinating.  The previous quote is actually a koan.  Like all koans it is designed to “not make any rational sense, and are used to ‘blow the minds’ of trainee monks in order to trigger their enlightenment.”  If you read it and interpret its meaning as it is, the problem with that is that after forty-one years teaching it is my experience that, “The student is never ready,” and that any lesson of any value, any lesson that is really transformative always appears as a kind of “inconvenient truth”.  God knows we don’t like to be inconvenienced.

The way most of us live our lives, making choices, or committing to anything is usually a function of how we feel at the moment.  If I were to do much of what I do let’s say just in the course of one day, according to how I feel, I wouldn’t accomplish much.  The first thing to realize is that our “feelings” about the moment are often unreliable and have nothing to do with this present moment.  They are almost 100% of the time connected to some past (unresolved issue) experience.  Relying on my feelings and I would include my opinions and points-of-view, as well as the beliefs I have formed about my life, is like relying on the other person to change before I can be happy. 

Certainly the student should “be ready to learn,” but what does that really mean;  To “be ready” to learn?  When are we “ready”?  Again I have found that we are never really ever ready for those transformative lessons in life.  Those lessons are either always heaped upon us at any unexpected and sudden moment or, we decide to apply what I always call “Nike Buddhism” or “Nike Zen” if you prefer: We learn to “Just do it”. 

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27
May
man disappointment

“The Difference”

“It’s Up to You!  It’s Always Been!  What Do You Want?”

In his book “A Monk in The World” Wayne Teasdale makes reference to one of several versions of a story told to me many years ago.  When I first heard it, it defined for me what I call “The Difference,” that one ingredient which separates novelty and authenticity.  My version tells the story of an encounter between a Zen master and one of his students.  The student in a rare opportunity approached the master challenging him about the notion of enlightenment.  “How is it possible to be truly free?”  “To live an unencumbered life, free of the mind’s distractions, worriments, and fear?”  The master invites the novice to walk with him and together they enter the forest surrounding the monastery.  The young person continues probing the master while he remains completely silent offering no response.  They eventually arrive at one of the lakes on the property and it is then the master speaks inviting his companion to join him as he cools off in the body of the lake.  No sooner they are waist deep in the lake and suddenly the master grabs the student and pushes him under the water, holding him there.  You can imagine the surprise and eventually the fear rising in the novice’s body.  It is almost to the moment when the student would naturally pass out and only then does his teacher lift him out of the water.  Gasping and kicking, obviously angry and afraid, he screams at the teacher, “What was that about?” “How could you do that to me?”  The Zen master walks to the shore with the screaming novice, shakes himself off and turns to the student saying to him, “When you truly want enlightenment as badly as you wanted your next breath, then and only then will all of your questions be answered and you will know the answers in your very body just as your body knew to choose life.”

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27
Apr
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Spiritual But Religious

“We are not human beings having a spiritual experience. We are spiritual beings having a human experience.”   ― Pierre Teilhard de Chardin

My life’s journey has been one of creating clarity, first for my own life and then as a teacher for others, and continues to be that way.  I believe that’s what’s so for all of us, the only difference may be is that we either consciously participate in that process or as the ancient Zen masters suggest, “We are dragged.”  From my earliest days I have preferred not to have scarred knees.

Since I can remember I have always felt a “calling” to spirituality and religious life, or as a young Catholic we called it a “Vocation,” and as a young Catholic feeling the inspiration I thought it was to the Priesthood.  It was, but not the Catholic Priesthood.  Do not misunderstand me, there never was a conversion for me though I no longer and haven’t for a number of years been a “practicing Catholic” I still hold very deep affections for the “community of saints” I have come to know and love over the years, and continue every year to entertain the desire to attend Christmas Eve Mass.  It is also important that you understand that even though Zen Buddhism has been my “vehicle of choice” for making this journey, I do not consider myself to be a Buddhist (in the conventional sense of the term) anymore than I was comfortable identifying with Catholicism or any “ism” as my religion.  In the end my True Religion has always been “Freedom”.  Zen Buddhism has and continues to prove to be the best fitting vehicle for both my nature and my heart’s desire.

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7
Apr
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Intentional Spirituality

There is a prayer I regularly offer at the altar in our Zendo, it goes like this:

“By the power and the truth of our efforts this day, may all beings everywhere be free of sorrow and suffering and the causes of sorrow and suffering; may all beings be content, and possess the causes for contentment and abundant prosperity. May all beings live in peace. This is our prayer, this is our intention.”

Can you identify the “intention”?  Whenever I ask people “What is your intention?”, they usually tell me a goal or list of goals, or they are unable to identify their intention. Perhaps it is because we don’t know what “intention” really is, let alone its power. Another word for intention I prefer using is “context”. By definition “context” is a “field of energy” a “force of nature” which “allows for a peculiar content to surface”; the effect or results of ones thoughts, words, and actions, which is one’s “karma”. Context or intention is ones real and honest motivation; a persons foundational or core purpose for their life, the real meaning for their words and actions.

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7
Mar
Makha Bucha Day Buddhist holy day

Time to Take Refuge

“In the Buddhist tradition, the purpose of taking refuge is to awaken from confusion and associate oneself with wakefulness. Taking refuge is a matter of commitment and acceptance and, at the same time, of openness and freedom. By taking the refuge vow we commit ourselves to freedom.” – Chogyam Trungpa

Fundamental to Buddhist Spirituality is the practice of “taking refuge”.  When I find myself in times of trouble, in times of uncertainty, in times of pain, what is my reaction, where do I turn? 

We are most certainly living in troubled times marked by uncertainty and dominated by what Buddhist call The Three Poisons of life – Greed, Anger or Resentment, and Indifference.  Many of us, myself included, often find ourselves stressed by the news of current events and the unknown about where we are headed both as a species and a country.  The historical resources we have relied on in the past to support us by providing unbiased and well informed, fact-based information, continue to disappoint us.  We are bombarded everyday not with information designed to inform and empower, but rather biased opinions and propaganda of a few whose agenda is exclusively a personal self-serving one.  Even when we turn to our neighbors and friends we can find ourselves more frustrated and frighten of the future when our conversation is rooted in fear and distrust rather than hope and vision.

I understand!

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24
Feb
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Entering the Path of the Spiritual Warrior

Entering The Path of The Spiritual Warrior
Training in Authentic Zen Spirituality – Part 1

Only as a Spiritual Warrior will one be able to navigate skillfully through the ever accelerating and complex challenges life will present in the 21st Century.  Their exists in our world today a tremendous and ever-increasing hunger on the part of everyone I meet for authentic experience and a reconnecting with what’s deepest and most meaningful about life. 

The Path of The Spiritual Warrior is one of daily transformation, a constant consciousness shift whereby ones attention is no longer directed toward the “pursuit of happiness” and simply surviving but, “learning to be content” and to thrive in the world by training to “be in the world but not of it”.

The basic difference between an ordinary person and a Warrior is that a Warrior sees the world as a space, one of infinite possibility, and his or her life as a series of unlimited potential paved with opportunities; challenges (lessons to be learned) rather than circumstances or situations to be conquered, feared, or avoided.

A Spiritual Warrior is someone who lives their life proactively and purposefully, whether meditating or in the workplace, raising a family or at evening liturgy.  He or she takes the inevitable ups and downs in stride, and sees painful circumstances, disappointments, and failures as challenges to work through, not as oppositional, to be feared, judged, or criticized.

The Warrior takes nothing for granted, living by a Code as his or her guidance or reference in life for navigating through uncertainty and impermanence.  For the warrior The Code is everything, the beginning and the end in all matters of uncertainty and conduct.

“You are here for no other purpose than to realize your inner divinity and manifest your inner enlightenment.  Foster peace in your own life and then apply the Art to all that you encounter.”

– Morihei Ueshiba

This is the Code, we are born for a singular purpose no matter our nationality, ethnicity, social and cultural status, religion or spirituality, or no religious or spiritual identity, we are here to “realize our inner divinity and manifest our enlightenment” for the benefit of others.  The Warrior does not need success, money, power, or status, he or she understands  that each of us possess all that we need here and now, now and always, “the kingdom of heaven is at hand…the kingdom of heaven is within you.”  Therefore the Warrior has no need to “pursue”, everything is already at hand, the Universe is within us and its infinite potential.  When there is no need to pursue then all that is required is to “manifest our enlightenment” in every moment.  When we are manifesting rather than pursuing, we are creating.  We we are creating we have moved from living at the effect of life to being cause.  When we know ourselves as “Cause” – we are reborn.

I love you,

Seijaku Roshi

  • Join me the 1st Wednesday of each month for – “A Course in Spirituality” at
    Pine Wind Zen Community.
  • Part #2 Coming – The Warriors Path

28
Jan
To Forgive is Divine

The Journey

A Course in Spirituality

The Journey

“In this globalized world, we have fallen into globalized indifference.  We have become used to the suffering of others:  it doesn’t affect me; it doesn’t concern me; its none of my business.” 

– Pope Francis

All of the joy, all the happiness, and any sense of fulfillment we spend our lives in pursuit of will be realized only when we return to the Path of Our True Destiny – We were born to connect with each other and to take care of each other.  “Community is Spirit” it is “The Guiding Light” of the Universe, forever calling us Home.  However, like the way we keep looking for the solutions to our personal suffering in all the wrong places, our Home is not a place or a destination – It is Each Other.  We will find our Home and Our True Self when we find Each Other.

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