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Jun

For Your Consideration….

June 14, 2016

Seijaku Roshi’s Meditation

“Do not be daunted by the enormity of the world’s grief.  Do justly, now.  Love mercy, now.  Walk humbly, now. You are not obligated to complete the work, but neither are you free to abandon it.” 

– The Talmud

Once again like millions my heart broke at the news of another mass shooting, senseless, without mercy, hateful.  I immediately began contacting old friends who I thought were potential victims.  Thank you God they weren’t.  Dear God what about those who were?  What about those who could be in the future?  What about my daughter?  What about the children?  Why?

I do not know the solutions to ending the plague of terrorism and war in our world and I do not want to pretend that I do.  I do know my heart hurts more and more for the victims of this madness; I am fearful for my daughter and her little friends, I want her Mom not to take her to the shore in a couple of weeks.  I had second thoughts about taking her and her new BFF to see TMNT at the Marlton 8 yesterday.  I’m a parent and the suffering of the world becomes more crisp for me everyday, I feel it in my bones, running through my veins.  It’s not over there, it’s right here.  What’s a “parent-monk” to do? 

The words of The Talmud resonate for me.  As a person who has dedicated his life to the principles of love, kindness, and compassion; the principles of justice for all, equality, mercy, all the while working at walking humbly, I have always felt, “Obligated to complete the work,” and I cannot find it within me even though I am tempted at times, to “abandon it”. 

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8
Jun

Are You Ready?

“When the student is ready the teacher will appear.”  I’ve thought a great deal about that and how it sounds a little like a saying that showed up in the 70’s, “Today is the first day of the rest of your life.” – And everyone I knew began procrastinating.  The previous quote is actually a koan.  Like all koans it is designed to “not make any rational sense, and are used to ‘blow the minds’ of trainee monks in order to trigger their enlightenment.”  If you read it and interpret its meaning as it is, the problem with that is that after forty-one years teaching it is my experience that, “The student is never ready,” and that any lesson of any value, any lesson that is really transformative always appears as a kind of “inconvenient truth”.  God knows we don’t like to be inconvenienced.

The way most of us live our lives, making choices, or committing to anything is usually a function of how we feel at the moment.  If I were to do much of what I do let’s say just in the course of one day, according to how I feel, I wouldn’t accomplish much.  The first thing to realize is that our “feelings” about the moment are often unreliable and have nothing to do with this present moment.  They are almost 100% of the time connected to some past (unresolved issue) experience.  Relying on my feelings and I would include my opinions and points-of-view, as well as the beliefs I have formed about my life, is like relying on the other person to change before I can be happy. 

Certainly the student should “be ready to learn,” but what does that really mean;  To “be ready” to learn?  When are we “ready”?  Again I have found that we are never really ever ready for those transformative lessons in life.  Those lessons are either always heaped upon us at any unexpected and sudden moment or, we decide to apply what I always call “Nike Buddhism” or “Nike Zen” if you prefer: We learn to “Just do it”. 

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