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Posts from the ‘Bodhisattva’ Category

7
Apr

Awake

I have spent more than half my lifetime inquiring about and observing the space I occupy and beyond. Science teaches us that the very material which makes up the known Universe can be found in a single human cell. With that I have always felt that the journey has always been one within and, if I cannot find it within me I cannot expect to find it anywhere out there. When I do find it within me, I will then find it everywhere out there.

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29
Mar

Vocation Not Vacation

“Underneath all we are taught, there is a voice that calls to us beyond what is reasonable, and in listening to that flicker of spirit, we often find deep healing.”

– Mark Nepo “The Book of Awakening”

Spirituality is not a vacation but rather a vocation. Meditation and Yoga, were never meant to be a means of escaping the world but rather, a means for entering into life more deeply and profoundly. While both the monk and the pilgrim may retreat from the world for a brief period of time, it’s not to escape but rather to train, to renew, to reconnect, in order to re-enter life more skillfully and with understanding and clarity developed while in retreat, learning to “be in the world more fully, intimately, and without reservation or self-preservation.”

The contemplative is not interested in either novelty or variety. He or she seeks a deeper meaning of life than the cultural or social definition accepted by so many. We train in the spiritual practices to learn “not to be daunted by the things of the world,” so that we can be present to our lives as they are, including our families, our friends, and our neighbors; and to the world as it is, and to the endless evolving and ever-changing circumstances of life, not as a victim of change but rather as a healing and reconciling force of Nature.

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24
Feb

The Heart of The Matter

We will match your capacity to inflict suffering with our capacity to endure suffering.  We will meet your physical force with soul force.  We will not hate you, but we cannot in all good conscience obey your unjust laws.  But we will soon wear you down by our capacity to endure suffering, and in winning our freedom, we will so appeal to your heart and conscience, that we will win yours in the process.”  – Martin Luther King, Jr.

Whether one is a Buddhist, a Christian, or Jewish, there exist certain universal convictions that the founders and their disciples of each of these paths held and continue to hold to be inviolable. 

“Every human being without exception possesses intrinsic dignity; everyone without exception should be treated with fairness, loving-kindness, and compassion; that each of us has the responsibility, and this includes how we treat the stranger, to protect those who cannot protect themselves, to lift up the fallen and provide them with basic tools to rebuild and flourish once again; and finally, the delicate web of the natural world should be handled with respect, and all natural resources should be used appropriately.”

Our nation and the world finds itself once again in tumultuous times marked by so much uncertainty and instability, accompanied by threats of increased violence and assaults on personal freedoms and basic human rights.  This time, however, it will not be enough to simply assign these dramatic changes which have already begun and the ones that are still ahead, to just the ruling party’s political platform or vision for the nation.  No, we are witnessing a dynamic effort to thwart the evolution of human consciousness that has been moving toward a more loving-kind and compassionate society, an inclusive society where no one is left behind or forgotten, a real and imminent threat upon the social fabric of our society and all humanity. 

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7
Feb

The Wisdom of Picking Your Battles

What lies in our power to do, it lies in our power not to do.
Aristotle

During this time of so much change and adversity, I am regularly reminded of some advise given me about parenting which has extended into all the roles I play at any given time.  “Pick your battles.”  Recently after making a decision back in November to spend less time watching cable news and visiting Pine Wind’s Facebook page, I made the error of visiting both the news media and social media a little more often than I would prefer to.  An error I have quickly corrected. However, for anyone who feels otherwise I would like to respectfully offer some advise.  Like so many I am sure, I find that more than necessary, repetition on current events and oppositional themes shot at me on Facebook. While one can certainly be entrapped by our emotions responding to every one of them, my advice is to “Pick Your Battles”.  (I also noticed one day while drinking my very large cup of coffee and getting lost in one of the cable news networks, that all they really do in the course of just two-hours is repeat over and over again the same news they reported just an hour ago, and they are masters at making it look like “Breaking News”.)  You don’t have to respond to each and every one of them.  In fact I think there is an important “lesson” to be learned in feeling that you do.

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16
Dec

Calling All Bodhisattva’s

To know one’s “intention” is vital for any healthy spiritual practice.  To live with “integrity” is quintessential.  Intention without integrity has no value.  We need to know our truest intention and then live intentionally with integrity.  Webster defines “integrity” as “a strict adherence to a particular way of being.”  When I live with integrity my intention is reflected in all my choices, in every decision I make.  It reflects in every word I speak, every action I commit. 

A “person of integrity” is reliable, their word is their bond, their actions reflect who they are, you always know where they are coming from.  I believe that integrity coalesces vision with action; it creates for sustainable and fulfilling relationship.  There is a saying in Zen, “Even if the Sun were to rise in the West, the Bodhisattva knows one way.”  No matter the circumstance, no matter the situation, no matter how I may feel at this moment, and even what I think, my integrity is my guide, my code for living my life, the cause for the effects or the results I aspire to create.  I often say, “There are days when I must muster up a whole universe of compassion for some people I may encounter.  And I do.”

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28
Nov

Back to The Future

“In the twenty-first century if we ever expect to fully realize peace of mind and body, we must cultivate a way-of-living which transcends religious and political ideology, and detach from our expectations on governments and religious institutions of themselves to ever bring about the transformation which leads to a loving-kind and compassionate society; one which is deeply rooted in personal responsibility, the practices of contemplation, and moral or ethical living.” 

  Seijaku Roshi

Often visitors to Pine Wind mistaken the fundamental aim and objective of the Zen practice of turning the most commonplace activities of daily living, the mundane, into a thing of spiritual beauty capable of transforming this place and time into the Kingdom of Heaven with, what they often identify with as just rituals of “another religion”.  There is a saying, “You don’t have to be a monk to live like a monk,” and I say, “but you have to live like a monk” if you are ever going to fully realize true and sustainable peace of mind and body.  The whole world needs to become your Zendo, a place of contemplation and prayer, where inner and outer charity, forgiveness, and loving-kindness, is our religion and way-of-life.  The conventional paradigm for “religion” and “religious affiliation,” like that of “political ideologies” and “political affiliations” in the modern culture has failed us and, will not be sufficient for the future if we ever expect to realize what people often refer to as, “The Oneness of Things”.  We cannot ever expect to know for sure that we are One People, One Nation, or One World as long as we cling to the “identities of religion and politics” which too often serve to separate us from the other.  They re-direct our attention and demand that our focus be on our “differences” rather than our “commonality”.  Love, equality, compassion, kindness, justice, freedom, equanimity, and abundant prosperity are not religious beliefs or political ideologies reserved for just believers or party members, they are the very essence of all life and humanity.  They are qualities of what Buddhist refer to as Buddha-Nature.

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15
Oct

Let’s Have That Revolution!

I will assume that anyone reading this has heard this before, “If you do not find peace within yourself, you will not find it anywhere.”  So perhaps you have heard it before or maybe this is the first time, either way, “It’s true!”  Our Nation and the World around us would not be witnessing what it is today if everyone were to take this to heart, embrace it, and live it.  Peace on Earth really does begin with you, it depends on you.  “If you do not find peace within yourself, forget Peace on Earth.”  This is not some Buddhist or Spiritual philosophy.  Think about it, our actions which create causes which create effects, flow from our thoughts and our emotional state of being.  It follows that when I am happy I behave in a completely different manner than when I am sad or angry.  When I am content with my life, with who I am, I will treat you in a completely different manner than if I am always craving what you have, jealous of what you have, or resentful for you having and I don’t.  Actions not only speak louder than words, they create lasting impressions like seed of consciousness which give rise to the future.  Action is “karma” and karma is the energy which gives form to our inner thoughts and emotions.  What we see out there began within us.

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27
Apr

Spiritual But Religious

“We are not human beings having a spiritual experience. We are spiritual beings having a human experience.”   ― Pierre Teilhard de Chardin

My life’s journey has been one of creating clarity, first for my own life and then as a teacher for others, and continues to be that way.  I believe that’s what’s so for all of us, the only difference may be is that we either consciously participate in that process or as the ancient Zen masters suggest, “We are dragged.”  From my earliest days I have preferred not to have scarred knees.

Since I can remember I have always felt a “calling” to spirituality and religious life, or as a young Catholic we called it a “Vocation,” and as a young Catholic feeling the inspiration I thought it was to the Priesthood.  It was, but not the Catholic Priesthood.  Do not misunderstand me, there never was a conversion for me though I no longer and haven’t for a number of years been a “practicing Catholic” I still hold very deep affections for the “community of saints” I have come to know and love over the years, and continue every year to entertain the desire to attend Christmas Eve Mass.  It is also important that you understand that even though Zen Buddhism has been my “vehicle of choice” for making this journey, I do not consider myself to be a Buddhist (in the conventional sense of the term) anymore than I was comfortable identifying with Catholicism or any “ism” as my religion.  In the end my True Religion has always been “Freedom”.  Zen Buddhism has and continues to prove to be the best fitting vehicle for both my nature and my heart’s desire.

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7
Apr

Intentional Spirituality

There is a prayer I regularly offer at the altar in our Zendo, it goes like this:

“By the power and the truth of our efforts this day, may all beings everywhere be free of sorrow and suffering and the causes of sorrow and suffering; may all beings be content, and possess the causes for contentment and abundant prosperity. May all beings live in peace. This is our prayer, this is our intention.”

Can you identify the “intention”?  Whenever I ask people “What is your intention?”, they usually tell me a goal or list of goals, or they are unable to identify their intention. Perhaps it is because we don’t know what “intention” really is, let alone its power. Another word for intention I prefer using is “context”. By definition “context” is a “field of energy” a “force of nature” which “allows for a peculiar content to surface”; the effect or results of ones thoughts, words, and actions, which is one’s “karma”. Context or intention is ones real and honest motivation; a persons foundational or core purpose for their life, the real meaning for their words and actions.

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24
Feb

Entering the Path of the Spiritual Warrior

Entering The Path of The Spiritual Warrior
Training in Authentic Zen Spirituality – Part 1

Only as a Spiritual Warrior will one be able to navigate skillfully through the ever accelerating and complex challenges life will present in the 21st Century.  Their exists in our world today a tremendous and ever-increasing hunger on the part of everyone I meet for authentic experience and a reconnecting with what’s deepest and most meaningful about life. 

The Path of The Spiritual Warrior is one of daily transformation, a constant consciousness shift whereby ones attention is no longer directed toward the “pursuit of happiness” and simply surviving but, “learning to be content” and to thrive in the world by training to “be in the world but not of it”.

The basic difference between an ordinary person and a Warrior is that a Warrior sees the world as a space, one of infinite possibility, and his or her life as a series of unlimited potential paved with opportunities; challenges (lessons to be learned) rather than circumstances or situations to be conquered, feared, or avoided.

A Spiritual Warrior is someone who lives their life proactively and purposefully, whether meditating or in the workplace, raising a family or at evening liturgy.  He or she takes the inevitable ups and downs in stride, and sees painful circumstances, disappointments, and failures as challenges to work through, not as oppositional, to be feared, judged, or criticized.

The Warrior takes nothing for granted, living by a Code as his or her guidance or reference in life for navigating through uncertainty and impermanence.  For the warrior The Code is everything, the beginning and the end in all matters of uncertainty and conduct.

“You are here for no other purpose than to realize your inner divinity and manifest your inner enlightenment.  Foster peace in your own life and then apply the Art to all that you encounter.”

– Morihei Ueshiba

This is the Code, we are born for a singular purpose no matter our nationality, ethnicity, social and cultural status, religion or spirituality, or no religious or spiritual identity, we are here to “realize our inner divinity and manifest our enlightenment” for the benefit of others.  The Warrior does not need success, money, power, or status, he or she understands  that each of us possess all that we need here and now, now and always, “the kingdom of heaven is at hand…the kingdom of heaven is within you.”  Therefore the Warrior has no need to “pursue”, everything is already at hand, the Universe is within us and its infinite potential.  When there is no need to pursue then all that is required is to “manifest our enlightenment” in every moment.  When we are manifesting rather than pursuing, we are creating.  We we are creating we have moved from living at the effect of life to being cause.  When we know ourselves as “Cause” – we are reborn.

I love you,

Seijaku Roshi

  • Join me the 1st Wednesday of each month for – “A Course in Spirituality” at
    Pine Wind Zen Community.
  • Part #2 Coming – The Warriors Path

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