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August 26, 2019

Living Spiritually

by Seijaku Roshi

“Our society suffers from a crises of connection, a crises of solidarity. We live in a culture of hyper-individualism. There is always tension between self and society, between the individual and the group. Over the past sixty years we have swung too far toward the self. The only way out is to rebalance, to build a culture that steers people toward relation, community, and commitment – the things we most deeply yearn for, yet undermine with our hyper-individualistic way of life.”

– David Brooks, The Second Mountain

While the meaning of spirituality like the meaning of love may be different to different people, traditionally, “spirituality” referred to a religious process of re-formation, “which aims to recover the original shape of man”. Fundamental to all of the Buddha’s teachings is the “interconnectedness and interdependency” of every life-form, our “true-nature”. We are “interconnected” and our very existence depends on our realization of this fact-of-life and the actualization of our interdependency by the ways in which we live our daily lives.

Chardin wrote, “You are not a human being in search of a spiritual experience. You are a spiritual being immersed in a human experience.” As “spiritual beings,” true and sustainable happiness is a function of “recovering our original shape” or “realizing our true-nature”, living as “spiritual beings immersed in a human experience”.

Spirituality is deeply rooted and deeply committed. It is a “committed life”. There are no options for those who live spiritually in the world. “Community is the Spirit, the Guiding Light.” For the truly spiritual it is our “interconnectedness and interdependency” which defines us and motivates our actions. It is not enough to believe “we are one,” our words, our life’s actions, choices, and ways of being must reflect our beliefs. “Whereby people come together to fulfill a purpose,” a “singular purpose”. That “purpose” being, “to live my life as a benefit for the whole of life”. We were born to bring to the world what the world needs. What the world needs is “benevolence,” a “community” of spiritual beings benefitting the world by the way they see themselves (thoughts), by the way they communicate (words), and by their choices and ways-of-living (actions). Spiritual beings; beings made up of the stuff of love, kindness, and compassion, immersed in the human experience to “realize their enlightenment and manifest their divinity” for the benefit of the whole world. And finally living together to, “help others fulfill their purpose,” and “to take care of one another.”

Living “spiritually” is a way-of-being in the world grounded in the belief in our inherent potential to love unconditionally, to care about each others well-being, to take care of each other and the whole of Nature. Living spiritually is living “Responsibly”. “Responsibility begins with the willingness to take the stand that one is cause in the matter of one’s life. It is a declaration, a context from which one chooses to live one’s life. Responsibility is not burden, fault, praise, blame, credit, shame or guilt. In responsibility, there is no evaluation of good or bad, right or wrong. There is simply what’s so in any given moment or circumstance or situation, and the stand you choose to take on what’s so. Responsibility begins with the willingness to deal with a situation from and with the point-of-view that you are the generator of what you do, what you have and what you are. It is a position which defines you and your way-of-being in the world, an empowering context that leaves you with a say in the matter of life.” Whenever a difficult situation surfaces in my life I do not look for fault, someone to blame or shame, or who’s guilty. I choose to be responsible for my reaction and for correcting the situation. When my brother or sister is hungry, I find a way to feed them. Where I see injustice, I work to reestablish justice. When I am hurt, I forgive. Because responsibility is “my position,” or the “context” I have chosen to live my life from, “I am” the source of my actions and my reactions, of what I want, and of who I am in the world.

Whenever we define ourselves or anything or anyone, we “fix the limits”. By definition to define is, to “fix the limits of”. Choosing to be responsible and to live spiritually in the world “defines” me, it is what determines both my potential and my limitations. Spirituality is “absolute”. Webster defines “absolute” as, “a value or principle which is regarded as universally valid or which may be viewed without relation to other things.” “In “idealist philosophy,” the “Absolute” is “the sum of all being, actual and potential”. In “monistic idealism,” it serves as a concept for the “unconditioned reality which is either the spiritual ground of all being or the whole of things considered as a spiritual unity.” (Wikipedia) Earlier I wrote that “spirituality is a committed life”. Not loving my fellow sentient beings, not being kind to everyone I meet, not showing compassion for the suffering and, not living my life as a benefit for others, is not an option. I don’t get to cherry pick the very basic principles of my life. I may make mistakes and even fail at times. Then I clean up my mess and get back to living spiritually in the world. But simply abandoning my identity because “I don’t feel like it today,” or “life is too difficult,” is not an option. I call this, “The Principle of Identity”. I am defined by the very principles I have chosen, or declare to be, “Who I want to be in the world”. Life’s circumstances and unexpected situations, unfulfilled expectations, and tragedies, do not define me. My “response” to life is “Who I Am”. I am a spiritual being, not a human being in search of a spiritual experience, “a spiritual being immersed in a human experience,” in order to learn, to grow, and to serve.

Living spiritually in the world is transformational. The dictionary defines “transformation” as, “a thorough or dramatic change in form or appearance; a metamorphosis; a change of the form or nature of a thing or person into a completely different one, by natural or supernatural means.” Living spiritually is not just a supplemental effort to simply make me feel better after a difficult day. It is a “re-formation which aims to recover the original shape of a person.” This involves a “thorough or dramatic change” in lifestyle including priorities, principles, choices, and decisions. Happiness, contentment, or joy is not the aim, but a bi-product of living spiritually.

Our social and cultural environment is not conducive for happiness or well-being. Any effort to simply supplement our daily experience with meditation, yoga, a prayer life, or any of the other spiritual practices, will always, result in just a temporary positive experience at best. In Zen, “learning to be content,” is choosing to be responsible, to be “cause” in the matters of my life. The source of my personal happiness, begins and ends with me. My lifestyle, my choices, my priorities reinforce my life’s experiences. Global transformation, begins and ends with me. My choice to heal rather than harm, to forgive rather than blame or shame, and to love “all the many beings” unconditionally, is the transformational force of the Universe.

You say, “You want to see the world change?” Well, all real change begins with real changes. “Be the change you want the world to be.”

I Love You,
Seijaku Roshi

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